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That's because that companion would be an autonomous delivery drone, a technology UPS and Workhorse Group are testing in rural residential areas with new brown trucks that house the flying machines. The drone would then autonomously deliver a package at a designated location while the driver continues to the next delivery spot.

Here's how the system works: The octocopter drone has a cage on the bottom, which extends through a hatch into the truck. And delivery companies around the world are trying to reduce the cost of last-mile trips with drones. Of course this isn't the first time any drone has been launched from a truck, but it is the first time that a UPS drone has launched from a UPS truck with a delivery.

In Monday's test in Florida, the drone used a preset route to deliver the package, but, in the future, UPS said it could use its existing software to route the drone.

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The second officer was in stable condition. "You just never know when officers respond to a call what they are going to run into". The officers, who had not yet been identified, approached the suspected gunman's vehicle completely unaware that it was stolen.


UPS said a reduction of just one mile per driver per day over one year can save the company up to $50 million. When the drone is docked, it's charging up to make a quick jaunt from the truck on the street to the customer's front door. UPS knows because it recently crashed a delivery drone in front of a bunch of reporters. Right now, the company has about 66,000 of them on the road each day. The driver then inserts the package, and presses a button on a touchscreen, thus sending the HorseFly on its route. When the drop is made, the drone would automatically know how to return to the truck and dock for another load.

According to UPS, this model has an endurance of 30-minutes, and can carry packages weighing up to 10 pounds (around 4.5 kilograms).

From a technology standpoint, the industry needs more development of "sense and avoid" technology to be ready to implement, and FAA still needs "to write the rules that will allow for the safe integration of commercial drones into the National Airspace.", he said. Since it's still illegal to fly a drone beyond the line of sight of the operator without special permission from the FAA, UPS probably had an observer making sure the drone performed correctly. Last September, UPS staged a mock delivery of urgently needed medicine from Beverly, Mass.to an island three miles off the Atlantic coast. "The drone is fully autonomous", said Stephen Burns, Workhorse founder and CEO. The committee will provide the FAA recommendations on key drone integration issues that will ultimately allow for safe and secure operations of drones within the National Air Space System.


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